Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Old ETL tools versus new ETL tools

After all, how could start-ups with a fraction of the resources of an IBM Corp., Oracle Corp., or SAP -- not to mention an Informatica Corp., Microsoft Corp., or SAS Institute Inc. -- hope to compete?

Something close to the opposite happened. Innovation might not exactly be thriving in the DI segment, but it's far from moribund. In the last year alone, upstart DI players such as Expressor Software Corp. and Talend arrived, touting two decidedly dissimilar -- but characteristically "next-gen" -- takes on DI. Their marketing pitches might differ dramatically, but both Expressor and Talend tout a flavor of "fresh" DI -- offerings they claim are faster, more flexible, and less "legacy" than established products.

According to Expressor officials, for example, the DI suites marketed by IBM, Informatica, and other heavyweights are powered by aging or "legacy" ETL technology that doesn't scale as well or which isn't as "smart" as Expressor's stuff.


"Sure, some of this stuff was created 15 years ago or 20 years ago -- but so was EAI. So was so much of the technology we use. Everything that's in the market now started a long time ago and evolved forward," he maintains. "It isn't a question of age. Just because something is built on older technology -- and we've done a lot of [modernization] work on our own with that product [InfoSphere Information Server] -- doesn't mean it's inefficient."

1 comment:

Charlotte said...

New this, old that....this is better no that ETL tool. So who is the expert? An ETL tool works either way but the newer tools have the latest software updates, but does it make it better versus the old tools?